"It’s important for little girls to know not every story has to be a love story and for boys to know that soldiers aren’t the only ones to triumph in war."

— Guillermo del Toro (via heynicolerae)

(Source: maxkirin, via mouthwords-memorytimes)

thisoldapt:

Or in plain terms, how to clean out your closet. -EL
VIA lifehacker

thisoldapt:

Or in plain terms, how to clean out your closet. -EL

VIA lifehacker

(via mydrunkkitchen)

Tags: infographic

(Source: msfili, via liamdryden)

bryankonietzko:

rufftoon:

Another GIF from the Korra season 3 finale. 
More beautiful animation- I love how she twists as she takes off that rock pillars’ top. 
There were some insane  awesome shots in both episodes and great choreography for the action sequences.

This whole exterior action sequence between Korra and Zaheer is co-executive producer Joaquim Dos Santos’ storyboarding/fight choreography masterpiece, especially the 20-plus-second continuous flying shot. It was a herculean undertaking, and he had some help cleaning up a few of the scenes by Owen Sullivan (on this one) and Shaun O’Neil. If you didn’t already know it, Joaquim is a force of nature when it comes to action animation!

bryankonietzko:

rufftoon:

Another GIF from the Korra season 3 finale. 

More beautiful animation- I love how she twists as she takes off that rock pillars’ top. 

There were some insane awesome shots in both episodes and great choreography for the action sequences.

This whole exterior action sequence between Korra and Zaheer is co-executive producer Joaquim Dos Santos’ storyboarding/fight choreography masterpiece, especially the 20-plus-second continuous flying shot. It was a herculean undertaking, and he had some help cleaning up a few of the scenes by Owen Sullivan (on this one) and Shaun O’Neil. If you didn’t already know it, Joaquim is a force of nature when it comes to action animation!

(Source: kuwabaraaa)

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

bookoisseur said: What is the best way to come to the attention of an organization like NPR that isn't an unpaid, student internship? Foot-in-the-door steps seem impossible post college.

npr:

We pay all of our student interns, for one thing. I would say the following applies to any job:

1. Do your research. When you apply for any job, have a website (it can be a tumblr) with your clips on it. Write a clear, well-researched cover letter. Explain what it is you want to do. Don’t say “your organization” — say “NPR.” Let us know you’re familiar with us. 

2. Network. This doesn’t require much. Follow people from the organization you would like to work on Twitter and Tumblr, so you will find out about jobs (we post all of ours with the hashtag #pubjobs) and can talk about specifics in the interivew.

3. Write. You are a person of the Internet. By this, I mean you have Tumblr and Twitter and all sorts of ways to get your writing and audio out there. Put your audio up on prx. Write stuff and submit it to NPR. (Here’s Code Switch’s tips on doing that.) There’s no reason not to start now.

mayefromtheshire:

thepluralisphoenixii:

imkatandimawesome:

sansaspark:

During the scene when Mulan decides to go to war instead of her father, she decides to do it while sitting on the foot of the Great Stone Dragon. The image of the dragon looking over Mulan is repeated several times throughout the sequence, and the bolts of lightning strike at significant times whenever the dragon is in sight. When Mulan takes her father’s scroll and when she is praying to her ancestors, the Great Stone Dragon can be seen. It is also engraved on the sword Mulan uses to cut her hair and the handles of the wardrobe containing the armor are in the shape of the dragon’s head. The dragon’s eyes glowing in the temple symbolizes Mulan’s role as protector of her family awakening, instead of the actual dragon.

The reason Mushu couldn’t wake the dragon is because the dragon was no longer there. Mulan is implied to be the Great Dragon that protects her family.

(via crazzle)

#EditorialCartoon by John Darkow; “Racism in America”

conspiracytheorist79:

image

(via political-cartoons)

leaveyouapen:

I’m high on believing
That you’re in love with me

(via liamdryden)

edwardspoonhands:

frankenstein-md:

Pemberley Digital Series’

Oh hell yeah.

esswishlist:

35. Bulbasaur Flowerpot (Succulent Monsters)
x7r found them! :) you can buy these from here or there is a 3D print version

esswishlist:

35. Bulbasaur Flowerpot (Succulent Monsters)

x7r found them! :) you can buy these from here or there is a 3D print version

(via liamdryden)

Tags: oh pokemon

michaelmidnight:

So Say We All

michaelmidnight:

So Say We All

(via liamdryden)

saracastically:

i’m so excited for hoenn round 2!!
commissions are open

(via batdude)